One step ahead

April 11, 2008 at 10:52 am 5 comments

     I often describe C as high maintenance. He requires a large amount of energy and brainpower on my part, and I compare it to having a 2 year old 10 year old. On one hand, he needs constant attention and supervision. On the other hand, he is very bright and knows things most 7 year olds don’t know (heck, he knows things most adults don’t know). This combination makes for one frazzled mama at times.

     I feel as though I am always trying to keep one (or two)  step(s) ahead of him. How is he going to react if I say this? What will he do if I try that?  Is there any way to avoid the stress he’ll face if we go here? What can I do to make sure this event is successful for him? How can I help him deal with his feelings if it isn’t? The adjustments we’ve made in daily life have become our new normal; so much so, I can go whole days without thinking about autism – until we go to the park, and then WHAM, I remember. 

     I sometimes laugh at myself because I am far from a career I so desperately wanted, and I worry I’m not using my brain or skills. Then I remember I’m using every brain cell and all my available skills to parent this child. I knew C would outsmart, outwit, and outlast me at some point in his life (yes, I’m a Survivor fan), but I never thought it would happen when he was 4. And now he’s 7. But in some areas he’s 2. Some he’s 10. You do the math.

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Entry filed under: autism. Tags: , , , , , .

C-isms, part III We are the champions

5 Comments Add your own

  • 1. jesch30  |  April 11, 2008 at 7:24 pm

    This is how you change the world.

    And, dear readers, if you want to invite questions as to how YOU change the world, please visit http://www.jesch.typepad.com

    Reply
  • 2. FXSmom  |  April 11, 2008 at 10:36 pm

    Matty is like that too. He is not near as bright as C but he is all over the board. He is either very over or very under his age. And in some things he is head on. It keeps us all hopping!!

    Never a dull moment, I always say. I kind of laugh at those developmental milestone charts that are always posted in the doc’s offices….C’s skills are so scattered. It really does make for challenging parenting, doesn’t it?

    Reply
  • 3. lastcrazyhorn  |  April 12, 2008 at 6:21 am

    On some days, the things that come out of my mouth are like what a tenured professor would say. On other days, they’re more like what a snarky 13 year old would say.

    My gross motor skills are often similar to that of an eleven year old boy’s, while my fine motor skills–in regards to music and art at least–are closer to that of a regular adult’s.

    My knowledge levels are a lot like that too. I didn’t know that “BM” stood for bowel movement until I was fifteen–and thought my mother was purposely making fun of me when she told me and I didn’t believe her. I didn’t know what the F-word meant or what the finger was until I was in the 8th grade; yet I used the word “claustrophobia” once as a six year old . . . correctly, I might add. That, and I have been making friends with random adults all of my life in all situations, telling them about my philosophies of life or what my latest interest was.

    Likewise, my heart is both innocent and distraught at the same time.

    Well, I think that about sums it up. I LOVE C’s innocence about things. He has no idea what Star Wars is and has no interest in Batman (sorry…not YET, anyway), and is terrified by Finding Nemo. But he knows what a cartographer is and who Frank LLoyd Wright was, and I LOVE THAT! And adults just dig him. They enjoy talking to him about their favorite President. The brain is an amazing thing…

    Reply
  • 4. lastcrazyhorn  |  April 12, 2008 at 11:01 pm

    Yeah, adults always got me a lot better than others. Especially adult-types who are left of mainstream and believe in all-natural things like living in the woods and not shaving . . . those types. lol Ironically enough, the undergrad I went to had a lot of professors like that, but I didn’t know that until I got there.

    My father would argue that nearly ALL college professors are those types. 🙂 Which, of course, is why I loved college….my poor father continues to hope that I’ll become conservative, but I just keep getting further and further away…

    Reply
  • 5. LoisR  |  April 14, 2008 at 2:43 am

    Please take the time to see this and share with other passengers…
    http://pixiesplace.com/trainride/

    Awww…..so cute, and I love the music.

    Reply

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